Discussion:
10 All time favors of painless death
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river
2008-03-08 13:05:33 UTC
All time favors of painless death

1- Nitrogen gas. Dead in 5 minutes. You wouldn't even know
you have pass out.
2 - Helium gas. Unconscious in 1 minute, dead in 6 minutes.
3 - Nembutal: (Pentobarbital Sodium), die peacefully in your sleep.
Unconscious in 5 minutes, dead in 30 minutes to 12 hours.
4 - High quality or pure heroin. Unconscious in 10 seconds. Dead
in 8 minutes.
5 - Fentanyl patches. Absolutely pain free. Die in your sleep.
6 - Darvon cocktail: dead in 1 hour to 11 hours
7 - Amitriptyline cocktail, unconscious in 30 minutes, dead within 16
hour.
8 - Gun, if aimed properly: unconscious in 10 microseconds,
dead in 3 seconds.
9 - Chopstick in a ear: unknown.
etc......
Avalanche
2008-03-08 18:18:20 UTC
Post by river
All time favors of painless death
1- Nitrogen gas. Dead in 5 minutes. You wouldn't even know
you have pass out.
2 - Helium gas. Unconscious in 1 minute, dead in 6 minutes.
3 - Nembutal: (Pentobarbital Sodium), die peacefully in your sleep.
Unconscious in 5 minutes, dead in 30 minutes to 12 hours.
4 - High quality or pure heroin. Unconscious in 10 seconds. Dead
in 8 minutes.
5 - Fentanyl patches. Absolutely pain free. Die in your sleep.
6 - Darvon cocktail: dead in 1 hour to 11 hours
7 - Amitriptyline cocktail, unconscious in 30 minutes, dead within 16
hour.
8 - Gun, if aimed properly: unconscious in 10 microseconds,
dead in 3 seconds.
9 - Chopstick in a ear: unknown.
etc......
Adding hypothermia onto this list, pretty damn high.
v***@gmail.com
2008-03-08 18:28:07 UTC
Post by river
All time favors of painless death
1-  Nitrogen gas. Dead in 5 minutes. You wouldn't even know
      you have pass out.
2 - Helium gas. Unconscious in 1 minute, dead in 6 minutes.
3 - Nembutal: (Pentobarbital Sodium), die peacefully in your sleep.
     Unconscious in 5 minutes, dead in 30 minutes to 12 hours.
4 - High quality or pure heroin. Unconscious in 10 seconds. Dead
     in 8 minutes.
5 - Fentanyl patches. Absolutely pain free. Die in your sleep.
6 - Darvon cocktail: dead in 1 hour to 11 hours
7 - Amitriptyline cocktail, unconscious in 30 minutes, dead within 16
hour.
8 - Gun, if aimed properly: unconscious in 10 microseconds,
     dead in 3 seconds.
9 - Chopstick in a ear: unknown.
      etc......
Adding hypothermia onto this list, pretty damn high.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
could you tell me about hypothermia and how cold it has to be before
you freeze to death?
Avalanche
2008-03-09 02:07:27 UTC
Post by v***@gmail.com
Post by river
All time favors of painless death
1- Nitrogen gas. Dead in 5 minutes. You wouldn't even know
you have pass out.
2 - Helium gas. Unconscious in 1 minute, dead in 6 minutes.
3 - Nembutal: (Pentobarbital Sodium), die peacefully in your sleep.
Unconscious in 5 minutes, dead in 30 minutes to 12 hours.
4 - High quality or pure heroin. Unconscious in 10 seconds. Dead
in 8 minutes.
5 - Fentanyl patches. Absolutely pain free. Die in your sleep.
6 - Darvon cocktail: dead in 1 hour to 11 hours
7 - Amitriptyline cocktail, unconscious in 30 minutes, dead within 16
hour.
8 - Gun, if aimed properly: unconscious in 10 microseconds,
dead in 3 seconds.
9 - Chopstick in a ear: unknown.
etc......
Adding hypothermia onto this list, pretty damn high.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
could you tell me about hypothermia and how cold it has to be before
you freeze to death?
I could, however a friend of mine does it far better;

"In a world reeking so pungently of decadence there is something very
seductive and iconic about escaping the trappings of urban living, the
city which so readily consumes and walking into the wilderness, into
nature, into the prehistoric constant of cold never to return. In my
mind the cold has always stood in the pantheon of metaphors for misery
and woe, a pristine snow-covered wilderness has always seemed like a
barren and solitary world in which I belong. Hypothermia is merely the
medical term for low or subnormal body temperature, hypo being the
Greek prefix for low or beneath and therm being the Greek for heat (ia
being the suffix. perhaps?). It is a condition which occurs when the
body cannot generate heat as fast as it looses it, causing the body
temperature to fall.

In normal environmental and physiological conditions the body can
maintain the core body temperature of 37 °C (give or take 0.5 °C) with
various internal regulating systems such was sweating when overheated
and shivering when cold. When the environment is too cool to maintain
the core body temperature the body will endeavour to warm its self by
raising the metabolic rate by increasing the levels of thyroid
hormones and adrenaline, shivering and vasoconstriction. Shivering
produces heat and therefore warms the body and vasoconstriction
reduces the blood flow to extremities thus less heat is lost to the
environment.

Hypothermia is a progressively debilitating condition, as the body
gradually cools the effects become more pronounced and severe. The
initial symptoms of mild hypothermia occur when the core body
temperature is between the ranges of 34-35 °C. These are
uncontrollable shivering, intense vasoconstriction and a drop in the
metabolic rate which causes other symptoms such as irrational
behaviour, lethargy, loss of co-ordination, head aches, slurred speech
and muscular weakness. Once the core body temperature passes 34 °C it
becomes a much more severe and dangerous condition classified
medically as moderate hypothermia (a core body temperature between
30-34 °C). In this range of temperature the body slowly looses its
various mechanisms for maintaining body temperature, beginning with
shivering and the pulse and respiratory rates drop dramatically.

Once the core body temperature falls between 30-32 °C consciousness is
lost, once it has fallen bellow 30 °C it is classified as severe
hypothermia. When it falls past 28 °C the likelihood of cardiac
arrhythmias and ventricular fibrillation rises dramatically due to the
reduced oxygen supply. If heart complications do not kill you first
and the body temperature falls bellow 25 °C death follows rapidly as
the body looses all mechanisms for regulating the core body
temperature (vasoconstriction) and heat is lost passively.

There are various physiological factors that affect the speed at which
heat is lost. The physiological factors are blindingly obvious such as
the physical build, drugs consumed and exercise and a persons ability
to shiver. A person's physical build alters how quickly they will
loose heat, the smaller the surface area the less the heat lost and
amount of subcutaneous fat which acts as natural insulation so someone
of a short stocky build will loose heat far slower than someone who is
tall and skinny. Various drugs change and can counteract the various
mechanisms the body employs to regulate the core body temperature. As
alcohol causes vasodilatation it counteracts vasoconstriction, which
is an essential mechanism for reducing heat loss to the environment
and impairs shivering it rapidly speeds up the rate at which heat is
lost to the environment by as much as 25%. Physical exercise increases
heat loss by one third as it has a similar effect upon
vasoconstriction as alcohol and it raises the heart rate.

The environmental factors are equally obvious as the physiological
factors that alter heat loss and are as follows, the temperature, the
wind chill factor, humidity and clothing. The wind chill factor occurs
because the movement of cold air increases the amount of "coldness" a
person is subjected to, therefore the greater the wind, the more air
that passes them, the more heat they will loose. It has a dramatic
effect upon heat loss, for example at - 7 °C with a wind speed of 5
mph the equivalent temperature is - 9°C, at 10 mph the equivalent
temperature is - 15 °C and at 25 mph the equivalent temperature is -26
°C. For a full table on the wind chill effect upon temperature and a
more detailed explanation see [1].

Hypothermia is by all accounts relatively painless, if you can cast
your mind to back to childhood days playing out in the snow you seldom
felt the cold until you came back and began to warm up. Only when
rewarming did you feel the agonising pain, pins and needles in your
hands and toes. In conjunction with alcohol the pain can be minimised
and speed at which it consumes you can be greatly increased. There are
a number of other things you can do to speed up the process, clothing
is the most obvious wear thin cotton garments and only one layer at
that. If you are exercising you cool much faster also so ideally walk
into the hills (preferably a very secluded spot), drinking until you
drop. Immersion in cold water causes cooling to occur much faster, but
cooling can also be increased without complete immersion by wetting
areas with a rich blood supply such as the groin, armpits and wrists."

I've anecdotal evidence of mine in another thread if you wish for it..
but I always found the above quite a beautiful tract.

ctbtoctb
2008-03-08 19:12:16 UTC
Post by river
All time favors of painless death
1-  Nitrogen gas. Dead in 5 minutes. You wouldn't even know
      you have pass out.
2 - Helium gas. Unconscious in 1 minute, dead in 6 minutes.
3 - Nembutal: (Pentobarbital Sodium), die peacefully in your sleep.
     Unconscious in 5 minutes, dead in 30 minutes to 12 hours.
4 - High quality or pure heroin. Unconscious in 10 seconds. Dead
     in 8 minutes.
5 - Fentanyl patches. Absolutely pain free. Die in your sleep.
6 - Darvon cocktail: dead in 1 hour to 11 hours
7 - Amitriptyline cocktail, unconscious in 30 minutes, dead within 16
hour.
8 - Gun, if aimed properly: unconscious in 10 microseconds,
     dead in 3 seconds.
9 - Chopstick in a ear: unknown.
      etc......
You might add CO poisoning to the list as long as you use Dormicum or
some other sleep aid to the equation.
Golden Gate
2008-03-08 21:31:17 UTC
Death by Chemicals


See The results. photo on the chem culture blog. Heres the link the
post is about mid page. This guy layed infront of a speeding truck. It
works but you may want to retink it.Here is The Link

http://chemicalculture.blogspot.com